Bug in Gaiatopia?


#1

Please forgive the pun. I started the game with about $11 billion in debts, 10% support, and a huge range of problems. About three-quarters of the way through my term, I had 45% popular support, several major problems resolved, and debt–originally down, now back up to its initial level.

The party kicked me out. This seems…suicidal. At best. My debt level was no worse than the start of the game, and it was largely due to worldwide recession. I’d greatly increased party support, and fixed a number of key issues. Seems like an eco-friendly party in an eco-friendly state shouldn’t kick out the best thing that’s happened to them because of a financial matter, especially when the result is nothing they haven’t seen, before.


#2

I’ve had a simillar problem. But what’s happened to me at times is that the income i get from my Income Tax just, disappears. Suddenly i end up with a deficit in one turn (once it went from a surplus of 4 Bn to a deficit of 45Bn!)


#3

Hmm sound strange, and not something I’m aware of. Is it possible a minister (in charge of tax) has resigned? or has an event such as market meltdown hit your GDP?


#4

Market meltdown maybe. But I just got two more bugs (still playing gaiatopia, have six awards btw, not going for Police State or Gods land). Tabacco tax disappeared when i looked at it, i was thinking of changing it. It didn’t say income or cost, then when i looked at the income graph, tabacco tax was not displayed. I also had an election where i had 100% for my part, but the opposition turnout read -0.1J# Any thoughts?


#5

Had you run out of smokers? the tax is dependenet on their being some, so as their numbers fall, so does your tax take. I suspect I have fixed that last bug, ready for the next patch.


#6

Smokers? That never was an issue in my bug–the one that started this thread.


#7

Gah! I just encountered the income tax bug (I know thats not the one at the start). Am trying to track it down now…


#8

Please forgive the pun. I started the game with about $11 billion in debts, 10% support, and a huge range of problems. About three-quarters of the way through my term, I had 45% popular support, several major problems resolved, and debt–originally down, now back up to its initial level.

The party kicked me out. This seems…suicidal. At best. My debt level was no worse than the start of the game, and it was largely due to worldwide recession. I’d greatly increased party support, and fixed a number of key issues. Seems like an eco-friendly party in an eco-friendly state shouldn’t kick out the best thing that’s happened to them because of a financial matter, especially when the result is nothing they haven’t seen, before. Is this a bug?


#9

was the debt level actually the same as when the game started, or had you gone above what it states as being the limit on the finance screen? I’m not sure if you are describing a bug, or just a weird effect of the game design.
In a sense, the voters in D2 do not care that you made things better as such, they just are not happy. This is a problem I’m trying to address lightly int he next patch, by modelling voters ‘complacency’ over time as you keep them happy.

I guess your description sounds like a lot of prime ministers and presidents who say how much they turned the country around, then get booted out and the next guy gets the credit. Some say Blair got the credit for Thatchers economy, and others say Bush got the credit for Clinton’s economy etc.


#10

As I recall, my final debt was actually $200,000 less than the debt I started out with, but I did not check beforehand for the limit on the finance screen. I figured that I had until I came within range of that initial date to make some structural changes improving the economy, and using up a bunch of political points I’d gradually saved over time.

That would make sense. Anyway you could get the party as well to send a note of concern if you reach a certain point above that “throw the bum out” limit?

I can’t speak to Blair/Thatcher, but Clinton did actually receive a great deal of the credit he deserved for the economic turnaround during his administration–and I write that as no great fan of the man. This credit was responsible for a fair portion of the “teflon coating” that kept polled Americans from blaming him when the Republican Congress launched their trumped-up impeachment proceedings. Bush in turn was generally viewed as a mediocrity with a sideorder of dangerous privilege-grasping until 9/11. No amount of Beltway punditry making something out of nothing could change that.