Smoking Ban


#1

I haven’t noticed this in the game but forgive me if its there, is there anyway to implement a smoking ban like the one coming in in England and the one already imposed in Scotland?

I saw the alcohol law but nothing for smoking apart from the tax.


#2

There’s none in the game so far. You can make it up, however.

(we have a similar ban here in many provinces in Canada).

Would really get mad smokers, would make unhappy capitalists too.

Would help a lot in lifespan


#3

I don’t know if it’s also possible but it would also have an affect on your economy, more people quitting smoking so less people buying them. Quite possible have an affect on liberals.

I know it’s possible to make one however I’m not entirely sure how the numbers work in the game.


#4

Range from “Banned indoors public areas” through “Banned in all public areas” to “Total Ban”.

It’s a nice idea. NZ’s pubs, bars, restaurants all went smokefree in December 2005. Since that time, there has been an increase in the number of people going to bars.

Would it be possible to make the ban eliminate the smoking tax?


#5

about the econoy…

Actually, if anything, the economy would go better. Why?

  1. Yeah, they don’t buy cigarettes anymore. But likely would be other stuff instead

2)Reduce cost of health care system, whichs means a LOT


#6

I’m not so sure on the smoking ban having so many pros, I have a gut feeling it would vary depending on the nation to be hit by it.

And as with any ban, crime should go up and income from said crime should as well. I’ll let you figure out what I’m implying there :slight_smile:


#7

well people living longer could mean longer health care costs. People who get lung cancer early through smoking dont incurr the costs associated with living till they are eighty :smiley:
So its hard to say what the precise effects are.
Some might say, that as most smoking-related deaths happen at or after retirement age, its a net-gain for the economy for these workers to die as soon as possible :smiley:


#8

Oh, and you know who else would hate it, probably even more than capitalists, is small business owners


#9

I’m pretty sure the cost of treating cancer is more than the cost of treating old age. It could be an improvement for the economy with a ban, as longer-lived workers can work for more years, such as grey-skills. In NZ, where there is a shortage of skilled workers, some are working into their 70s, especially in the building trades.

Unless there is a random-effect generator, it’d be best to leave economy=no change until some studies come out.

While we’re at it, why not an Alcohol ban as well?


#10

There are effects noone predicted.

In the Express today was an excellent article about the closure of around 600 Irish pubs and clubs since the ban there, and the effect it’s having on Irish music. They reckon there’s only 15 good pub/club venues for Irish bands to play these days. This is a cultural effect, not sure which of the voter groups it would alter :slight_smile:

EDIT: This is also an detrimental economic effect, obviously.


#11

I wasn’t able to find the story online you talked about (or perhaps I did and didn’t realise), but it seems to me (from nzherald.co.nz/section/story … D=10388841) that it’s more because of changes to rural Ireland than it is because of the smoking ban.

Why would post offices and shops also be closing down because of a smoking ban? It seems like this story was tilted to be pro-smoking.

That being said, there have been downturns here for rural pubs, while urban pubs have had big increases.


#12

Well if Irish pubs are anything like British pubs, they would have been on the decline anyway. The Irish Government also imposed very harsh drink driving laws, and a lot of Irish rural pubs are out of the way and rely on people driving to them and back home.

A combination of increasing taxes, overheads and the destruction of local breweries in many parts of Britain and (oddly) incredibly cheap alcohol available in shops had led to the British pub decline.

A lot of pubs rely on a small core group of regulars, and in my experience, these people smoke. A great number of people that go to pubs for pubs themselves (a signifigant proportion of these regulars), rather than to eat or for an occasion/celebration, do smoke. A public smoking ban (in Britain) would probably be the last nail in the coffin for many pubs.

If you consider that pubs provide a social gathering point, a testing ground for new artists etc. and define a big part of British culture, the knock on effect could be huge. It is my opinion also that rural pubs are the most important pubs, cities are gathering places anyway and are not representative of a national culture because they tend to be insolated. London could be a country all of its own.

Sorry for the long post.