Strange behavior with Immigration Demand

I noticed this while playing Japan: Regardless of how I set our immigration rules, the Illegal Immigration output from Immigration Demand is still extremely high.

This is the effect on Illegal Immigration:
IllegalImmigration,[etc.],#,ImmigrationDemand,1.0-(ImmigrationRules*x)

If I’m reading this correctly, as Immigration Demand decreases, the effect on Illegal Immigration increases, which seems bizarre to me.

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Did you set the borders high enough?

Yes, I can easily prevent an Illegal Immigration Crisis by using Border Controls or similar policies.

The problem is that, if your Immigration Demand is very low, you shouldn’t need to have a strong border to prevent illegal immigration, because hardly anyone wants to immigrate there anyway.

To illustrate how the formula goes wrong:

  • The effect on Illegal Immigration is 1 - (Immigration Rules × Immigration Demand)
  • If Immigration Demand is at 0, then it’s 1 - (Immigration Rules × 0)
  • No matter what your Immigration Rules are, it’s multiplied by zero, so it’s 1 - (0) = 1
  • Therefore, Illegal Immigration is boosted by 1, which is 100%.
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I see your point, thank you.

Just to further illustrate, here’s how it looks on turn one in Japan. Notice how the effect on Illegal Immigration is almost at 100%, despite almost no Immigration Demand.

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Illegal immigration is exactly what it says. Its immigration that happens to try and bypass your immigration rules, and your refugee rules.
If your refugee rules are really strict, and your immigration rules are really strict, that will push illegal immigration up, because all those folk who would normally have been coming in legally as immigrants or refugees try to come as illegal immigrats instead.

Border walls and navies and other policies should be able to reduce that actual level though.

Note that overall immigration demand is not directly under your control, as external events and the strength of your GDP will push total demand up or down.

Is that helpful? or am I stating the obvious and there is still an unexplained issue here?

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He is saying that for some reason, you can have a high level of illegal immigration even without barely any immigration demand and with high immigration rules.

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Right… ok interesting. I shall dig into it soon.

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While on the subject of Immigration’s effects, I remembered during a replay that in D3(A), high levels of Immigration boosts GDP. Is there a reason this effect wasn’t carried over to D4?

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Because immigration demand wasn’t thought as a concept at first.

There have been a few rounds of immigration overhaul in D4 already, if things are a little quirky that’s why. I’m sure by now Cliff is sick of hearing about it.

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